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Published 23 April 2017 venezuelanalysis.com

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Venezuela is in flames. Or at least parts of it is. Since April 4th, opposition militants have been carrying out targeted acts of violence, vandalism and arson, as well as deliberately clashing with security forces in an attempt to plunge the country into total chaos and forcefully remove the elected socialist government. It is the continuation of an 18 year effort to topple the Bolivarian revolution by any means necessary — although you may have seen it miraculously recast in the mainstream media as “promoting a return to democracy” in the country.

A catalogue of the violence over the last 18 days is shocking – schools have been ransacked, a Supreme Court building has been torched, an air force base attacked, while public transport, health and veterinary facilities have been destroyed. At least 23 people have been left dead, with many more injured. In one of the most shocking cases of right-wing violence, at around 10pm on April 20th, women, children and over 50 newborn babies had to be evacuated by the government from a public maternity hospital which came under attack from opposition gangs.

Anywhere else in the western world, this would have given way to horrified international and national calls for an end to the violence, and for the swift prosecution of those responsible – making it all the more scandalous that these incidents have at best been ignored, and at worst totally misrepresented by the international press. Instead, those tasked with providing the public with unbiased reporting on international affairs have opted to uncritically parrot the Venezuelan opposition’s claims that the elected government is violently repressing peaceful protests, and holding it responsible for all deaths in connection with the demonstrations so far.

This narrative cannot be described as even a remotely accurate interpretation of the facts, and so it is important to set the record straight.

Published 24 April 2017 by Granma

 

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Fully committed to the use of solar energy, one of the essential future renewable energy sources for Cuba and a basic element on the path to changing our energy system, Cienfuegos province already has four solar parks running at full capacity and is working toward completing the fifth.

Jesús Rey Pérez Crespo, director of the Cienfuegos Electric Company, reported that the four parks have a combined generation capacity of 11.2 MW. Once the fifth park comes into operation this year, this capacity will reach 16 MW, he noted.

The new facility, located in Yaguaramas, Abreus municipality, will be the largest of the territory up until now. It covers an area of more than seven hectares and includes 19,400 solar panels.

Pérez Crespo explained that close to 80% of the civil construction works have been completed.

Backed by the “Mofcom Program of nine MW” (five MW here and four in Pinar del Río), the park received a Chinese technological donation, while the Cuban side is assuming the construction and assembly phases.

The director revealed that this year construction works will begin on a further two solar parks in Ariza, Rhodes municipality, and in Aguada de Pasajeros. Both will start operations in 2018 and with these the province will reach a total capacity of 26 MW.

Several solar parks are to be installed in Cienfuegos up until 2030, in order to exceed 50 MW of generation capacity.

Published on 21 April 2017 by TeleSUR English
 
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Twenty-eight newborn babies had to be transferred to another hospital in the capital in order to ensure their safety.

Venezuela's Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez announced on her Twitter account that "armed gangs hired by the opposition attacked a maternal and children's hospital with 54 children (inside)."

She also said that President Nicolas Maduro ordered the evacuation of the hospital, adding, "We will defeat the coup attempt."

The Hugo Rafael Chavez Frias Maternal and Children's Hospital is located in the El Valle neighborhood ofCaracas. Rodriguez also blamed right-wing governments for helping incite the violence.

"The small group of governments that have expressed their public support for the Venezuelan opposition has encouraged this vandalism and extreme violence," she said.

Those working in the hospital said that the attack started at around 9. p.m. Thursday and lasted for close to three hours.

"We were attacked by violent groups that showered us with stones and sharp objects (and) then burned a large amount of garbage from the hospital – the smoke penetrated inside the premises," said hospital manager Dr. Rosalinda Prieto, adding that there were newborn babies in the emergency area.

Publised on 18 April 2017 by TeleSUR English
 
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President Kuczynski estimated last week that Peru would need up to US$9 billion to rebuild from the damages.

As deadly weather continues to plague Peru, the latest reported death toll in the country puts the number killed by deadly floods at 113

According to a report released Tuesday by the National Emergency Operations Center, 178,701 people have been affected, and at least 237,906 homes have been damaged.

Rainfall has also destroyed 2,542 kilometers of roads and thousands of hectares of crops. Farmers are asking for government assistance to help recover from the devastation.

President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski estimated last week that Peru would need up to US$9 billion to rebuild and modernize areas that have been affected by natural disasters.

leading in the way of international solidarity efforts is Cuba, who has sent its Henry Reeve Medical Brigade, which specializes in disasters and epidemics. The group includes 11 doctors, 10 health care professionals, an administrator, and a lead doctor, who in just a few short weeks have seen more than 6,000 affected people.

According to experts, the warming of the waters of the Pacific Ocean in northern Peru has led to a phenomenon called "El Niño Costero," with has led to the heavy rains, landslides and floods.

Those hardest hit have been the poor, most notably Peruvians who built their homes on cheap land near the river, which runs from Peru's central Andes to the Pacific coast.

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